Why Is The Rim Important? It’s Just a Plate or a Tray.

Many times, in creating the mosaics, I incorporate older, used objects into my art. Although the trays, plates and bowels have a certain beauty and character, the rim is the most important feature. The rim frames the mosaic and adds a sculptural element. It is an essential part of the art.

Below are a few images of my mosaic art where the rim is a key element.

 

The rim of this silver plated tray compliments the glass, creating a  luminous mosaic. The scalloped design at the edge of the rim adds the sculptural effect.
Brass Plate 1
The wide brass rim of the this plate accentuates the bold red and yellow glass in the mosaic. This  is an example of how the rim frames the mosaic and is an essential part of the art.
The wide, white rim with the blue trim framing the mosaic,  focuses the eye on the art. Once again, the rim becomes an essential part of the art.

Lady Oneida

How to name a piece of art? It is difficult. Sometimes, it is better to let the piece speak for its self. However, in setting the mosaics within a tray or a dish, I name the piece after the manufacturer. Lady Oneida derives her name from the Oneida Company, the maker of this silver plated, butler’s tray. Oneida, founded in 1880 is still in business, part of the Anchor Hocking Company. They no longer make silver plated trays.

This vintage butler’s tray adds additional character to the mosaic. The handles and the flowered rim are distinct, complimenting the mosaic. The tray, originally tarnished and scratched, now has a new life as a piece of fine art.

Lady Oneida is decorative, functional and she may help to strike up a conversation.

Art, a ConstantLearning Process, Scrap Glass to Mosaics

After I am finished working on the stained glass panels, I am left with buckets and trays of scrap glass that are hard to rework into a new panel. The scrap pieces are large or small and have odd shapes. They are still good and usable. And I felt it would be a damn shame to toss them, a waste of money and time. They have value and a wonderful look.

This has led me to mosaics, painting with glass, a craft and a fine art form. Rather than fuss around with an instruction book or take a craft class, I enrolled into classes at the Chicago Mosaic School, a major center for mosaic arts in the United States. Aside from its professional staff, the school hosts influential, international mosaic artists who teach aspiring artists in special workshops.

First steps are ragged as I am learning the craft but, I believe, promising. Below a sample of the my first attempts at mosaics.